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Education Kits - Endangered Birds and Old Growth Forests

Learn about the Spotted Owl, Marbled Murrelet, and more!

Old growth forests are critical ecosystems for many organisms, especially endangered animals like spotted owl and marbled murrelet. This education kit introduces students to this unique habitat and the ecological impacts they make across the globe. All the lessons are divided into five categories:

1) What is an old growth forest? Explore the important structural elements found in old growth forests, think about how plant diversity keeps forests healthy, and learn about forest succession.

2) Trees Learn about the many organisms that depend on trees and what parts are important to them, discover how large an old growth tree really is, and explore trees with all your senses!

3) Marbled Murrelet and Spotted Owl Become an endangered bird and try to survive common life cycle challenges, examine the differences between spotted owl and its closest cousin, the barred owl, read a story and create a poster illustrating the complex relationship between marbled murrelet and their nesting trees, and more!

4) Ecosystem Interactions Have fun with a collection of old growth forest web of life cards, create a newspaper from the perspective of old growth forest organisms, and learn about the adaptations of old growth forest wildlife.

5) Fragmentation and Habitat Loss Learn about forest fragmentation and its effects on wildlife, discover the ways habitat loss occurs, enjoy various activities after reading Dr. Seuss' The Lorax, and empower yourself with action items to help prevent habitat loss.

Pricing: $35 per week, $10 each additional week (3 week maximum)

Questions? For more information and reservations, please contact Hanae Bettencourt, Education Associate, at 206-523-8243 ext.18, or email kits@seattleaudubon.org.

Seattle Audubon is nonprofit, tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization. Copyright 2017 Seattle Audubon.